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Professional Product Review Vol. 8 | Issue 3 | 2013 : Page 1

Volume 8 • Issue 3 2013 A Publication of the Council on Scientific Affairs In This Issue: Unbiased. Scientifically Sound. Clinically Relevant. User-Friendly. Letter from the Editor -David C. Sarrett, DMD, MS Bulk-fill composites are popular restorative materials that have been on the market for several years. Unlike traditional composites, which typically are placed in maximum increments of 2 mm, bulk-fill composites are designed to be placed in 4 mm, or sometimes greater, increments. Restoring a tooth in one step certainly appears to save time, but there are some concerns. For example, manufacturers claim that bulk-fill materials have greater depth of cure and lower polymerization-induced shrinkage stress. For this issue, the ADA Laboratory purchased 12 currently marketed bulk-fill materials and evaluated several physical and mechanical properties, comparing the products to one another and to traditional composites. This evaluation found performance of restoratives in both categories to be acceptable according to an international standard, with the exception of depth of cure and hardness. Three of the bulk-fill resin-based composites did not achieve adequate depth of cure when tested according to the standard. All products but one demonstrated adequate hardness after curing in a subsequent test (Knoop hardness test). With the exception of depth of cure and Knoop hardness, we found the laboratory performance of bulk-fill resin-based composites to be comparable to that of traditional multi-increment—fill resin-based composites. The second article, “Evaluation of Four Dental Clinical Spectrophotometers Relative to Human Shade Observation,” speaks to one of the more challenging tasks in dentistry--selecting a shade for a restoration on a single maxillary central incisor. The correct shade of a crown has little importance in the success of the restoration, but is often the patient’s foremost concern. The authors also investigated the influence of ambient lighting and evaluator’s color acuity in shade selection. I hope you’ll find both studies interesting and informative. Have a question or a comment? Drop me a line at ppreditor@ada.org Editor David C. Sarrett, DMD, MS Chair, ADA Council on Scientific Affairs Dr. Stephen K. Harrel Senior VP, Science/ Professional Affairs Daniel M. Meyer, DDS Senior Director, Research and Laboratories Gregory G. Zeller, DDS, MS Program Manager Nina A. Koziol Letters to the Editor, Reprints and Permissions ppreditor@ada.org, 312.440.2840 Internet ada.org/ppr © American Dental Association, 2013. All rights reserved. Evaluation of Four Dental Clinical Spectrophotometers Relative to Human Shade Observation A Laboratory Evaluation Of Bulk-Fill Versus Traditional Multi-Increment–Fill Resin-Based Composites page 2 page 13 211 East Chicago Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60611-2678 ISSN 1930-8736

Letter from the Editor

David C. Sarrett

<br /> Bulk-fill composites are popular restorative materials that have been on the market for several years. Unlike traditional composites, which typically are placed in maximum increments of 2 mm, bulk-fill composites are designed to be placed in 4 mm, or sometimes greater, increments. Restoring a tooth in one step certainly appears to save time, but there are some concerns. For example, manufacturers claim that bulk-fill materials have greater depth of cure and lower polymerization-induced shrinkage stress. <br /> <br /> For this issue, the ADA Laboratory purchased 12 currently marketed bulk-fill materials and evaluated several physical and mechanical properties, comparing the products to one another and to traditional composites. This evaluation found performance of restoratives in both categories to be acceptable according to an international standard, with the exception of depth of cure and hardness. Three of the bulk-fill resin-based composites did not achieve adequate depth of cure when tested according to the standard. All products but one demonstrated adequate hardness after curing in a subsequent test (Knoop hardness test). With the exception of depth of cure and Knoop hardness, we found the laboratory performance of bulk-fill resin-based composites to be comparable to that of traditional multi-increment—fill resin-based composites. <br /> <br /> The second article, “Evaluation of Four Dental Clinical Spectrophotometers Relative to Human Shade Observation,” speaks to one of the more challenging tasks in dentistry--selecting a shade for a restoration on a single maxillary central incisor. The correct shade of a crown has little importance in the success of the restoration, but is often the patient’s foremost concern. The authors also investigated the influence of ambient lighting and evaluator’s color acuity in shade selection. I hope you’ll find both studies interesting and informative. Have a question or a comment? Drop me a line at ppreditor@ada.org

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