Background Image

Professional Product Review Vol. 8 | Issue 2 | 2013 : Page 1

Volume 8 • Issue 2 2013 A Publication of the Council on Scientific Affairs In This Issue: Unbiased. Scientifically Sound. Clinically Relevant. User-Friendly. Letter from the Editor -David C. Sarrett, DMD Millions of resin restorations and light-cured sealants are placed each year and curing lights are essential for those procedures. But how can you be certain that your curing light delivers the correct irradiance, exposure patterns and spectral emission to safely cure a resin-based restoration so that it performs as the manufacturer intended? To address these common concerns, this issue features “Effective Use of Dental Curing Lights: A Guide for the Dental Practitioner,” a series of short articles by several key opinion leaders. Whether you’ve used curing lights for more than two decades as I have, or you’re fresh out of dental school, the articles can help you optimize your light-curing technique. You may be surprised that such a common technique as light-curing of resin materials can be so negatively affected by very common issues. Besides curing lights, high-speed dental handpieces are another staple for most dental practices. The Review published laboratory evaluations of several brands in the past, but handpiece manufacturers continue to refine their products, making modifications and improvements to address dentists’ needs and preferences. For this issue, the ADA Laboratories evaluated two disposable handpieces—the Azenic DHP from Azenic, Inc., (Kalamazoo, MI), and the Hi-Speed Turbine Handpiece for Single Use-GSY Series from NPH USA, Inc. (Orlando, FL). If you’re wondering who would use a disposable handpiece, consider that these devices may be useful in clinical settings that present unusual operating conditions or challenging infection control situations where sterilization is not practical or cost-effective, such as remote or mobile clinics, medical missions or military field installations, or perhaps in a busy practice as a backup if no sterile reusable handpiece is available. What product or product category would you like to see featured in the ADA Professional Product Review? Drop me a line at pprclinical@ada.org. Volume 8 • Issue 2 August 2013 Editor David C. Sarrett, DMD, MS Chair, ADA Council on Scientific Affairs Dr. Stephen K. Harrel Senior VP, Science/ Professional Affairs Daniel M. Meyer, DDS Senior Director, Research and Laboratories Gregory G. Zeller, DDS, MS Technical Editor Nina A. Koziol Letters to the Editor, Reprints and Permissions ppreditor@ada.org, 312.440.2840 Internet ada.org/ppr © American Dental Association, 2013. All rights reserved. Effective Use of Dental Curing Lights: A Guide for the Dental Practitioner Disposable Handpieces: A Laboratory Evaluation of Two New Products page 2 page 13 211 East Chicago Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60611-2678 ISSN 1930-8736

Letter from the Editor

David C. Sarrett

Millions of resin restorations and light-cured sealants are placed each year and curing lights are essential for those procedures. But how can you be certain that your curing light delivers the correct irradiance, exposure patterns and spectral emission to safely cure a resin-based restoration so that it performs as the manufacturer intended? To address these common concerns, this issue features “Effective Use of Dental Curing Lights: A Guide for the Dental Practitioner,” a series of short articles by several key opinion leaders. Whether you’ve used curing lights for more than two decades as I have, or you’re fresh out of dental school, the articles can help you optimize your light-curing technique. You may be surprised that such a common technique as light-curing of resin materials can be so negatively affected by very common issues.<br /> <br /> Besides curing lights, high-speed dental handpieces are another staple for most dental practices. The Review published laboratory evaluations of several brands in the past, but handpiece manufacturers continue to refine their products, making modifications and improvements to address dentists’ needs and preferences.<br /> <br /> For this issue, the ADA Laboratories evaluated two disposable handpieces—the Azenic DHP from Azenic, Inc., (Kalamazoo, MI), and the Hi-Speed Turbine Handpiece for Single Use-GSY Series from NPH USA, Inc. (Orlando, FL). If you’re wondering who would use a disposable handpiece, consider that these devices may be useful in clinical settings that present unusual operating conditions or challenging infection control situations where sterilization is not practical or cost-effective, such as remote or mobile clinics, medical missions or military field installations, or perhaps in a busy practice as a backup if no sterile reusable handpiece is available.<br /> <br /> What product or product category would you like to see featured in the ADA Professional Product Review? Drop me a line at pprclinical@ada.org. <br />

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here