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Professional Product Review Vol. 8 | Issue 1 | 2013 : Page 1

Volume 8 • Issue 1 2013 A Publication of the Council on Scientific Affairs In This Issue: Unbiased. Scientifically Sound. Clinically Relevant. User-Friendly. Letter from the Editor -David C. Sarrett, DMD It’s been more than 20 years since clinicians routinely began reaching for exam gloves. While the ability of dental gloves to prevent disease transmission is vital for patients and dental personnel, there is some inherent risk in using any infection control product. Although data indicate that the risk of transmitting bloodborne pathogens in health-care settings—including dental offices—is low, some risk is unavoidable. In this issue, we take a look at the integrity and performance of gloves in two articles: A Laboratory Analysis of Latex Examination Gloves and Evaluating the Water Tightness of Powder-Free Natural Rubber Latex Exam Gloves Following Simulated Clinical Use: A Pilot Study. The performance standards for regulatory approval of dental gloves are well established, but they don’t address wear performance or simulated use. The only testing necessary to meet the standard is conducted on products taken right from the box. It may surprise you to learn that a certain level of glove failure “out of the box” is allowed in standardized laboratory glove testing. And, in a sample test size of 125 gloves, seven may fail and the overall sample still can be deemed acceptable. I think you’ll find the laboratory and clinical simulation results interesting. Editor David C. Sarrett, DMD, MS Chair, ADA Council on Scientific Affairs Dr. Stephen K. Harrel Senior VP, Science/ Professional Affairs Daniel M. Meyer, DDS Senior Director, Research and Laboratories Gregory G. Zeller, DDS, MS Technical Editor Nina A. Koziol Letters to the Editor, Reprints and Permissions ppreditor@ada.org, 312.440.2840 Internet ada.org/ppr © American Dental Association, 2012. All rights reserved. Also in this issue is the first of two articles on Bisphenol A (BPA) in dental materials. In the past year, there’s been increased media attention on BPA and its potential impact on health and human development. Sensational headlines have linked BPA to everything from heart disease, coronary artery disease, and obesity to diabetes and immune system and reproductive disorders. The Update: Bisphenol A in Dental Materials explores the question, “Why would BPA appear in ‘BPA-free’ dental materials?” It also examines BPA exposure levels and how to address patient concerns. In a future issue, we’ll report on the ADA Laboratory’s evaluation of BPA in dental materials. Lastly, we’ve included Palliative Over-the-Counter (OTC) Treatments for Oral Dryness and Associated Inflammation , an overview of clinical approaches for managing oral dryness with over-the-counter products. The article includes examples of the various types of products available on the U.S. market. If there’s something you’d like to see in the ADA Professional Product Review, drop me a line at pprclinical@ada.org. Update: Bisphenol A in Dental Materials A Laboratory Analysis of Latex Examination Gloves Evaluating the Water Tightness of Powder-Free Natural Rubber Latex (NRL) Exam Gloves Following Simulated Clinical Use Dental Therapeutics: Palliative Over-the-Counter (OTC) Treatments for Oral Dryness and Associated Inflammation 211 East Chicago Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60611-2678 page 2 page 6 page 17 page 21 ISSN 1930-8736

Letter from the Editor

David C. Sarrett

It’s been more than 20 years since clinicians routinely began reaching for exam gloves. While the ability of dental gloves to prevent disease transmission is vital for patients and dental personnel, there is some inherent risk in using any infection control product. Although data indicate that the risk of transmitting bloodborne pathogens in health-care settings—including dental offices—is low, some risk is unavoidable.<br /> <br /> In this issue, we take a look at the integrity and performance of gloves in two articles: A Laboratory Analysis of Latex Examination Gloves and Evaluating the Water Tightness of Powder-Free Natural Rubber Latex Exam Gloves Following Simulated Clinical Use: A Pilot Study. <br /> <br /> The performance standards for regulatory approval of dental gloves are well established, but they don’t address wear performance or simulated use. The only testing necessary to meet the standard is conducted on products taken right from the box. It may surprise you to learn that a certain level of glove failure “out of the box” is allowed in standardized laboratory glove testing. And, in a sample test size of 125 gloves, seven may fail and the overall sample still can be deemed acceptable. I think you’ll find the laboratory and clinical simulation results interesting.<br /> <br /> Also in this issue is the first of two articles on Bisphenol A (BPA) in dental materials. In the past year, there’s been increased media attention on BPA and its potential impact on health and human development. Sensational headlines have linked BPA to everything from heart disease, coronary artery disease, and obesity to diabetes and immune system and reproductive disorders. The Update: Bisphenol A in Dental Materials explores the question, “Why would BPA appear in ‘BPA-free’ dental materials?” It also examines BPA exposure levels and how to address patient concerns. In a future issue, we’ll report on the ADA Laboratory’s evaluation of BPA in dental materials. <br /> <br /> Lastly, we’ve included Palliative Over-the-Counter (OTC) Treatments for Oral Dryness and Associated Inflammation, an overview of clinical approaches for managing oral dryness with over-the-counter products. The article includes examples of the various types of products available on the U.S. market. <br /> <br /> If there’s something you’d like to see in the ADA Professional Product Review, drop me a line at pprclinical@ada.org.<br />

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