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Professional Product Review Vol. 7 | Issue 3 | 2012 : Page 1

Volume 7 • Issue 3 2012 A Publication of the Council on Scientific Affairs In This Issue: Unbiased. Scientifically Sound. Clinically Relevant. User-Friendly. Letter from the Editor -David C. Sarrett, DMD Among the many risks that dentists must manage are percutaneous injuries—those occupational risks presented by sharps, needles and burs. The Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, signed into law in 2000, directed OSHA to revise its Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, which applies to all employers who have employees with reasonably anticipated occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. The revised standard requires documenting the annual consideration and implementation of appropriate engineering controls, and soliciting non-managerial healthcare workers in evaluating and choosing devices. Needlestick injuries are only a small part of all percutaneous injuries in dental practice. Some bur injuries occur when a handpiece, resting in its holder, has an exposed bur pointing toward the dentist who accidentally scrapes a hand or arm against it. In this issue, the article, “Safe Injection Practices: Protecting Dentists, Their Staff and Their Patients,” takes a look at preventing percutaneous injuries along with examples of products and resources currently available for that purpose. I think you’ll find the data on percutaneous injuries, which was collected over the past two decades at the ADA’s Health Screening Program, very interesting. Also in this issue is an evaluation of vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) occlusal registration materials. The ADA Laboratory purchased and evaluated eight products that were suggested by the ADA Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel. The laboratory tested several characteristics of the products: consistency, contact angle, strain in compression, elastic recovery, detail reproduction, gypsum compatibility, and dimensional stability before and after disinfection. This is our third online-only issue of the ADA Professional Product Review. I’d like to hear from you. What products would you like to see evaluated? What products have been troublesome in your practice and why? Drop me a line at pprclinical@ada.org. All the best to you, your staff and family as we approach the holiday season. Editor David C. Sarrett, DMD, MS Chair, ADA Council on Scientific Affairs Dr. Stephen K. Harrel Senior VP, Science/ Professional Affairs Daniel M. Meyer, DDS Senior Director, Research and Laboratories Gregory G. Zeller, DDS, MS Technical Editor Nina A. Koziol Letters to the Editor, Reprints and Permissions ppreditor@ada.org, 312.440.2840 Internet ada.org/ppr © American Dental Association, 2012. All rights reserved. An Evaluation of Eight Elastomeric Occlusal Registration Materials Safe Injection Practices: Protecting Dentists, Their Staff and Their Patients 211 East Chicago Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60611-2678 ISSN 1930-8736 December 2012 page 9 Volume 7 • Issue 3 page 2

Letter From The Editor

David C. Sarrett, DMD

Unbiased. <br /> <br /> Scientifically Sound. <br /> <br /> Clinically Relevant. <br /> <br /> User-Friendly.<br /> <br /> <br /> Among the many risks that dentists must manage are percutaneous injuries—those occupational risks presented by sharps, needles and burs. The Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, signed into law in 2000, directed OSHA to revise its Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, which applies to all employers who have employees with reasonably anticipated occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. The revised standard requires documenting the annual consideration and implementation of appropriate engineering controls, and soliciting non-managerial healthcare workers in evaluating and choosing devices. <br /> <br /> Needlestick injuries are only a small part of all percutaneous injuries in dental practice. Some bur injuries occur when a handpiece, resting in its holder, has an exposed bur pointing toward the dentist who accidentally scrapes a hand or arm against it. In this issue, the article, “Safe Injection Practices: Protecting Dentists, Their Staff and Their Patients,” takes a look at preventing percutaneous injuries along with examples of products and resources currently available for that purpose. I think you’ll find the data on percutaneous injuries, which was collected over the past two decades at the ADA’s Health Screening Program, very interesting. <br /> <br /> Also in this issue is an evaluation of vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) occlusal registration materials. The ADA Laboratory purchased and evaluated eight products that were suggested by the ADA Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel. The laboratory tested several characteristics of the products: consistency, contact angle, strain in compression, elastic recovery, detail reproduction, gypsum compatibility, and dimensional stability before and after disinfection. <br /> <br /> This is our third online-only issue of the ADA Professional Product Review. I’d like to hear from you. What products would you like to see evaluated? What products have been troublesome in your practice and why? Drop me a line at pprclinical@ada.org. <br /> <br /> All the best to you, your staff and family as we approach the holiday season.<br /> <br />

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