FORE July/August 2012 : Page 54

HANDICAP HINTS %$&. WR%DVLFV 1 o matter if you are a sea-soned golfi ng veteran or a new golfer just starting out, we all should be following the basics of the USGA Handicap System. As a brand new golfer, you won’t have a Handicap Index. That’s a number, with one decimal place (for example, 19.5), issued by your golf club. It represents your potential playing ability. You receive a valid USGA Handicap Index after posting fi ve 18-hole rounds (or 10 nine-hole rounds) that have been processed through a revision (issued on the fi rst and 15th of each month). Your Handicap Index will convert 1, 2 and 3 and one stroke on handicap stroke holes 4-18. If you’re competing from differ-ent tees, there is an adjustment that must be made. A higher Course Rating means it is a more diffi cult course, so to make it equitable, the difference between the Course Ratings is added to the person playing the harder course. Player A, with a Course Handicap of 21, is playing from the middle tees (68.9/121) and Player B, also with a Course Handicap of 21, is playing from the back tees (70.8/123). The differ-ence between the Course Ratings is two strokes (70.8 -68.9 = 1.9, rounded to 2) so Player B’s Course Handicap is now 23 (21 + 2). This adjustment for different tees must be made if it’s men vs. men, men vs. women from different tees or the same tees. Scores to Post: • Scores from home and away courses • Scores in all forms of play: match play, stroke play, even in team competitions in which you are requested to pick up • Scores when at least seven holes are played on a rated set of nine holes (7-12 holes are posted as a nine-hole score). • 13 or more are posted as an 18-hole score. Note: For any holes not completed, you post par plus any handicap strokes you are entitled to on those remaining holes. You should post your score imme-diately after your round at the course you played. Some clubs will allow you to post your scores via the Internet; check with your club to see if you are able to do that. In a subsequent column, we’ll discuss how to adjust your scores. SCGA.ORG BY GERI DECK, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, HANDICAP AND MEMBERSHIP 54 | FORE Magazine | JULY/AUGUST 2012 to a Course Handicap, which is the number of strokes needed to play a specifi c set of tees. Say you play your favorite course from the middle set of tees, which have a Course Rating of 68.9 and a Slope Rating of 121. Be sure to identify the correct ratings for your gender. Men and women will have dif-ferent Course and Slope Ratings for the same set of tees. Using a 19.5 Handicap Index as an example, check the Course Handicap Table and fi nd the 121 Slope table and locate 19.5 Handicap Index. Your Course Handicap for those tees is 21, so you receive 21 strokes. Each hole has a handicap stroke allocation number. Place one stroke on each hole starting at No. 1 and fi nishing at No. 18. Repeat until all the strokes are used up. In this case, the player will receive two strokes on handicap stroke holes

Handicap Hints

Geri Deck

<br /> BACK to Basics<br /> <br /> No matter if you are a seasoned golfing veteran or a new golfer just starting out, we all should be following the basics of the USGA Handicap System.<br /> <br /> As a brand new golfer, you won’t have a Handicap Index. That’s a number, with one decimal place (for example, 19.5), issued by your golf club. It represents your potential playing ability. You receive a valid USGA Handicap Index after posting five 18-hole rounds (or 10 nine-hole rounds) that have been processed through a revision (issued on the first and 15th of each month).<br /> <br /> Your Handicap Index will convert to a Course Handicap, which is the number of strokes needed to play a specific set of tees. Say you play your favorite course from the middle set of tees, which have a Course Rating of 68.9 and a Slope Rating of 121. Be sure to identify the correct ratings for your gender. Men and women will have different Course and Slope Ratings for the same set of tees. Using a 19.5 Handicap Index as an example, check the Course Handicap Table and find the 121 Slope table and locate 19.5 Handicap Index. Your Course Handicap for those tees is 21, so you receive 21 strokes. Each hole has a handicap stroke allocation number. Place one stroke on each hole starting at No. 1 and finishing at No. 18. Repeat until all the strokes are used up. In this case, the player will receive two strokes on handicap stroke holes 1, 2 and 3 and one stroke on handicap stroke holes 4-18.<br /> <br /> If you’re competing from different tees, there is an adjustment that must be made. A higher Course Rating means it is a more difficult course, so to make it equitable, the difference between the Course Ratings is added to the person playing the harder course. Player A, with a Course Handicap of 21, is playing from the middle tees (68.9/121) and Player B, also with a Course Handicap of 21, is playing from the back tees (70.8/123). The difference between the Course Ratings is two strokes (70.8 - 68.9 = 1.9, rounded to 2) so Player B’s Course Handicap is now 23 (21 + 2). This adjustment for different tees must be made if it’s men vs. men, men vs. women from different tees or the same tees.<br /> <br /> Scores to Post:<br /> <br /> • Scores from home and away courses<br /> <br /> • Scores in all forms of play: match play, stroke play, even in team competitions in which you are requested to pick up<br /> <br /> • Scores when at least seven holes are played on a rated set of nine holes (7-12 holes are posted as a nine hole score).<br /> <br /> • 13 or more are posted as an 18-hole score.<br /> <br /> Note: For any holes not completed, you post par plus any handicap strokes you are entitled to on those remaining holes.<br /> <br /> You should post your score immediately after your round at the course you played. Some clubs will allow you to post your scores via the Internet; check with your club to see if you are able to do that.<br /> <br /> In a subsequent column, we’ll discuss how to adjust your scores. <br />

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here